Don’t Let PAIN Keep You on the Sidelines this Summer

It’s time to get out and enjoy the Ohio sunshine again! Farmer’s Markets, gardening, fishing, golfing, biking, picnics, baseball, kayaking, swimming, and all our other favorite spring and summer activities. Often times participating in our favorite activities can cause muscle fatigue, aches and pains. Muscle tension will cause shorting of muscles and you’ll have less range of motion than normal. Now more than ever, it’s important to take care of you, to heal the tension before it causes injuries. After all, who wants to sit on the sidelines watching and not participating?

An hour of massage can do more for you than just take the pressures of the day away. Studies show that the more massages you can allow yourself, the better you’ll feel. Touch is a natural human reaction to pain and stress, and for conveying compassion and support.  ink of the last time you bumped your toe or had a cramping calf muscle. What did you do, rub it? The professional massage therapists at Nature’s Touch know how to apply the right kinds of techniques to muscles and joints to release tightness, cramping, spasms, and knots. Oftentimes your follow-up appointment will require a shorter session on specific regionals; working on shoulders, necks, arms, backs, or legs only rather than a whole body massage. These shorter sessions are also
effective in providing the benefits of massage by releasing your pain and making you feel great again.

Equally important as the season changes is to maintain adequate hydration. Muscles and tissues require lots of fluids as well as good wholesome nutrition to function properly and to avoid spasms and sprains. When we work or exercise hard our muscles build up lactic acid which will cause spasms or strains.  is creates those painful “knots” we often experience that can shorten our range of motion. Staying hydrated and receiving regular massage sessions this summer will help keep you moving and grooving and having some seasonal fun.

To find out more about how these therapies can help your specific problem contact Nature’s Touch Massage & Wellness Center at (330) 721-9357,
e-mail NaturesTouch4U@aol.com or visit our website at www.NTWellnessCenter.com.

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A look into the March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center Labs: Washington University/St. Louis

Circadian rhythms have a profound effect on metabolism, the immune system – and in the latest reserach from Drs. Herzog and Jungheim, maybe even preterm birth.

Screen Shot 2017-06-02 at 11.49.03 AMWe’ve long known that our circadian rhythms have profound effects on how — and especially when — we go about our daily lives. These cycles are influenced by the various intervals of light and darkness we experience over a 24-hour period, but also can be triggered by biological factors, our genetics and even our environment. The range of circadian impacts runs from relatively unnoticed, like our moods and ability to cope with stressors, to the most obvious, like when we are hungry or sleepy.

Circadian rhythms also have a profound effect on the onset of labor, with approximately 80% of women going into spontaneous labor between late night and early morning. And some studies have even shown that altering a pregnant woman’s circadian rhythms can disrupt the fetus’ growth and development. But could these rhythms also be a key factor in preterm birth? That’s exactly what a team of researchers at the March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center at Washington University in St. Louis are working on.

“The hypothesis we’re testing is that circadian rhythms in the mother, the fetus, or both, regulate birth timing, and when disrupted, may lead to preterm birth,” Dr. Herzog explained. “This chronodisruption, as it’s called, can be brought on by a number of factors, including shift work, exposure to artificial light, even irregular meals and sleep times. Our goal is to see how these disruptions influence preterm birth.”

The study has two parts. The first is to determine whether genetic or environmental disruptions of circadian rhythms lead to increased preterm birth risk in mice. The second part of the study is a pilot that will monitor and test 100 women pre- and post-conception to determine when disruption of the circadian rhythms of women with certain chronotypes, (e.g., larks vs. owls) increases their risk for preterm birth. The study will then be extended to 1000 women.

Also working on Theme Three at Washington University at St. Louis are Dr. Justin Fay, Ph.D., an associate professor of genetics, and Dr. Sarah K. England, a professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Dr. Jeff Gill, a professor of Political Science.

“By correlating the data we receive with genetic variations, we’ll also be able to trace any outcomes back to a woman’s specific biology,” said Dr. Fay, “to determine what role genetics plays in affecting circadian rhythm.”

Another leader working on this theme is Dr. Emily Jungheim. She sees the potential for the results of this research to positively affect the women in her practice.

“When I talk to young reproductive age women who are trying to have a child, the things that really speak to them are those they can do themselves to improve their outcomes,” she said. “They’re so motivated to do whatever they can to ensure they’re going to have a healthy start for their baby.”

And modifying those outcomes could be as simple as having a regularly scheduled bedtime.

For more information on prematurity research breakthroughs, we invite you to sign up for the Campaign to End Premature Birth newsletter.

Screen Shot 2017-06-02 at 11.52.17 AMwww.prematurityresearch.org
For more information on how you can be part of this effort, contact
philanthropy@marchofdimes.org

Source: March of Dimes 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue White Plains, NY 10605

Kathumbi elected first African-American president of the Ohio Women’s Bar Association

Screen Shot 2017-06-02 at 11.35.14 AMCOLUMBUS, OHIO – Lisa Kathumbi, a partner in Bricker & Eckler’s Employment and Healthcare practice group, has been named president of the Ohio Women’s Bar Association (OWBA). Kathumbi is the first African-American president in the 25-year history of the association.

“We are incredibly proud of the work Lisa is doing with the OWBA,” said Kurt Tunnell, Bricker’s managing partner. “Our firm is known for its long history and commitment to bar service and leadership, and for groundbreaking diversity.  Lisa is continuing the tradition.”

To kick off her year as OWBA president, Kathumbi developed the programming for the 2017 OWBA Annual Meeting and Conference this month, which featured keynote speakers Lucy Helm, Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Starbucks, and Carrie Hightman, Executive Vice President & Chief Legal Officer of NiSource Inc. “We were excited to have the opportunity to welcome two Fortune 500 General Counsel who have shattered glass ceilings”, said Kathumbi. The conference theme, Critical Conversations and Courageous Leadership, tackled  some of the most significant issues facing the legal profession, including the persistent gender gap at the highest levels of leadership. In addition to Helm and Hightman, the conference included perspectives from not only local lawyers and judges, but from business and community leaders. “Our goal was to share diverse ideas, develop strategies, and continue to build capacity through collaboration,” noted Kathumbi.

A steadfast advocate for the OWBA since joining the board in 2011, Kathumbi was named the recipient of the association’s President’s Choice Award in 2014 for contributing ongoing support, energy, talent, time and vision, and for promoting diversity and inclusion within the organization and profession.

At Bricker, Kathumbi represents and counsels employers, ranging from small businesses to Fortune 500 companies across jurisdictions in a broad range of labor and employment and ERISA litigation matters. Kathumbi also works with clients to navigate the legal risks of day-to-day employment decisions, and conducts litigation avoidance training and seminars. Her strong reputation has earned industry accolades, including 2014 and 2015 recognition as a Rising Star in Ohio Super Lawyers®. In addition to her work with the OWBA, Kathumbi is a 2017 fellow in the Leadership Council on Legal Diversity (LCLD) and was recently selected as a 2017 Women WELDing the Way honoree by the Ohio Chapter of Women for Economic and Leadership Development (WELD).

“I look forward to continuing to work with an incredibly talented board of highly accomplished attorneys and judges and I am honored and humbled to join a long list of women leaders who I admire and who have served as president of the association,” said Kathumbi.

Kathumbi earned her J.D. and B.A. from the University of Cincinnati College of Law, and her M.A. from the University of Chicago.

About the Ohio Women’s Bar Association: The mission of the Ohio Women’s Bar Association is to promote the leadership, advancement and interests of women attorneys through professional education, networking and the exchange of ideas between our members, local bar associations, business and the community.

About Bricker & Eckler: With offices throughout the state, Bricker & Eckler is one of Ohio’s leading law firms. Bricker represents a wide variety of clients, with particular strength in representing health care, public sector, financial services and energy clients in Ohio and beyond. The firm has a long history of promoting and supporting diversity and inclusion in an ongoing effort to reflect the communities and clients it serves.

Source: Bricker & Eckler LLP, 100 South Third Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215, United States