Americans are Facing a Hope Crisis

 

Hopeologist® Rosalind Tompkins seeks to inspire more than 10,000 ‘hope connections’ in 2018, beginning in April, National Month of Hope

Research studies have found that people who are hopeful excel in life, live longer and live well. But sometimes hope needs a little assist, notes Rosalind Tompkins, creator of the first National Month of Hope, in April.
Through her organization Mothers In Crisis, Tompkins is issuing a Hope Challenge to ordinary people to reach out to folks they know at work or in their community who are feeling hopeless perhaps due to job loss, marital troubles or struggles with addiction.

Calling herself a Hopeologist®, a person who changes the world through hope, Tompkins has set an impressive goal—fostering at least 10,000 “hope chats” this year. She says, “We are challenging people to ‘think hope’ and ‘make hope connections.’ We are planning ‘hope chats’ in our local community where our team will go out to local parks and spread hope every Saturday. We encourage other organizations to do the same in their local communities.”

Tompkins says hope chats can be highly impactful. For example, one member of her team had such a chat with an unemployed father of four whose marriage was floundering. The man thanked her for taking the time to connect with him and two weeks later, let her know that his life was already much better. He had found a job and he and his wife were doing better. The team member was happy too. “She said that she felt good about it because before the Hope Challenge she would have handled the situation totally differently and probably felt hopeless herself,” Tompkins says.

The team member followed the challenge’s seven steps: identify, prepare, go, listen, encourage, empower and wrap up. Among the things she said to him were: “I care about you and wanted to check in with you to see how things are going” and “Just know that I am here for you and I believe that things are going to get better because remember, as long as there is breath in your body, there is hope.”

“We believe that people will come away with the knowledge that things are going to get better and it starts with us,” Tompkins says. “We can have hope and give hope. We can change the world through hope one person at a time.”

About Rosalind Tompkins
Rosalind Tompkins is the founder of Mothers in Crisis, a nonprofit comprised of women and men in recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. Her humanitarian work has taken her to East, Central, and South Africa, Jamaica and Turkey, to help widows, orphans, and refugees. She also founded Turning Point International Church and its school of ministry. She has written four books including As Long As There Is Breath In Your Body, There Is Hope.

Contact: Rosalind Tompkins, (850) 933-2412; 192620@email4pr.com
SOURCE Rosalind Tompkins

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