In Era Of #MeToo, Majority Of Employees Say Their Employers Fail To Take New Steps Addressing Sexual Harassment

Increased efforts to prevent harassment linked to better employee and organizational outcomes, survey says

The spotlight on workplace sexual harassment since fall 2017 has led to high-profile resignations, terminations and lawsuits. And while the revelations and consequences have prompted ongoing, national conversations about appropriate behavior, only 32 percent of working Americans said that their employer has taken new steps to prevent and address sexual harassment in the workplace, according to a survey by the American Psychological Association.

According to employees, the most common action taken was simply reminding employees of existing sexual harassment training or resources (18 percent).

Workplace Sexual Harassment: Are Employers Actually Responding? from APA’s Center for Organizational Excellence was conducted online by Harris Poll from Feb. 15-March 1, 2018, among 1,512 U.S. adults who are employed full-time, part-time or self-employed. The data were collected as part of APA’s 2018 Work and Well-Being Survey. While the lack of meaningful change is not entirely surprising, it is disappointing, said David W. Ballard, PsyD, MBA, director of APA’s Center for Organizational Excellence. “The #MeToo movement has given business leaders an opportunity to finally take real action addressing a complex problem that has been pervasive for generations,” Ballard said. “Our survey – as well as anecdotal reports – shows that too few employers are making comprehensive efforts that can have significant impact. Avoiding the issue is bad for employee well-being and business, but so, too, is a narrow, compliance-based approach. We know from psychological science that relying solely on mandated training designed primarily to limit the organization’s legal liability is unlikely to be effective.”

Only 10 percent of U.S. workers said their employer has added more training or resources related to sexual harassment since the recent increased media and public attention on this serious workplace problem. Just 8 percent said their employer implemented a more stringent policy related to sexual harassment, and only 7 percent reported that their employer hosted an all-staff meeting or town hall to discuss sexual harassment.

Research has shown training to recognize and report sexual harassment isn’t enough to change employee behavior or a workplace culture where harassment is more likely to occur. Instead, psychologists recommend a comprehensive approach that incorporates fair policies that are clearly communicated, ongoing training, leadership support of a civil and respectful culture, and the hiring and promotion of women into senior leadership roles.

The survey showed the difference when women have representation in upper management. Employees in organizations that have women in senior leadership roles said they were more likely to report sexual harassment at work if they experienced it (56 percent) or witnessed it (55 percent), and confront a coworker who is engaging in inappropriate sexual behavior at work (53 percent), compared with employees in organizations that don’t have women in senior leadership roles (39 percent, 41 percent and 34 percent, respectively).

The survey also found links between increased efforts to prevent and address workplace sexual harassment and better employee and organizational outcomes more broadly. When new steps had been taken, employees were more likely to say they were in good psychological health (90 percent vs. 79 percent) and that their employer provides the necessary resources to help employees meet their mental health needs (76 percent vs. 36 percent) and manage their stress (63 percent vs. 31 percent). They also reported higher job satisfaction (86 percent vs. 60 percent) and motivation to do their best at work (89 percent vs. 64 percent) and were more likely to say they’d recommend their organization as a good place to work (79 percent vs. 51 percent), than those who said their employer had not taken any new steps.

“Sexual harassment at work occurs within a broader context,” Ballard said. “For training to produce long-term changes, the organization’s workplace practices need to align with and support the individual attitudes and behaviors it’s trying to promote. Leaders in a psychologically healthy workplace model civility, respect, fairness and trust. In an organizational culture where every employee feels safe, supported and included, people can be their best, and that’s good for people and profits.”

While most employers have been slow in taking new steps to address harassment, the ongoing headlines and resulting conversations may be encouraging individual employees to take action. About half of U.S. workers say they are now more likely to report workplace sexual harassment if they experience it (50 percent) or witness it (51 percent), and that they are more likely to confront a coworker who is engaging in inappropriate sexual behavior at work (47 percent).

About the Center for Organizational Excellence
APA’s Center for Organizational Excellence works to enhance the functioning of individuals, groups, organizations and communities through the application of psychology to a broad range of workplace issues. The center houses the Psychologically Healthy Workplace Program, a public education initiative designed to engage the employer community, raise public awareness about the value psychology brings to the workplace and promote programs and policies that enhance employee well-being and organizational performance.

About the Survey
The survey was conducted online within the United States by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Psychological Association between February 15 and March 1, 2018, among a nationally representative sample of 1,512 adults age 18 and older who reside in the U.S. and were employed full time, part time or self-employed. Data are weighted where necessary to bring them in line with their actual proportions in the population. A full methodology is available upon request.

About The Harris Poll
The Harris Poll is one of the longest running surveys in the U.S. tracking public opinion, motivations and social sentiment since 1963 that is now part of Harris Insights & Analytics, a global consulting and market research firm that delivers social intelligence for transformational times.
The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA’s membership includes nearly 115,700 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives.

SOURCE American Psychological Association
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Are Female Entrepreneurs More Successful Than Males? Data Says “Yes!”

While it’s no surprise that men own more businesses than women, some studies suggest their revenues and job creation rates apparently lag behind their female peers.  That’s part of a larger analysis conducted by FitSmallBusiness.com, the digital business publication.

More than 75 percent of businesses are male-owned, so it might logically follow that men are more successful entrepreneurs than women.  But data analyzed by FitSmallBusiness.com suggests that in reality, women tend to be more effective leaders, they create more jobs, have a larger appetite for growth, and significantly improve startup company performance. When you consider all the statistics, women entrepreneurs outperformed male entrepreneurs.

HERE is the full list of reasons why women are better entrepreneurs than men.

The publication researched and analyzed data from key sources such as the U.S. Census Bureau; Dow Jones, the Harvard Business Review, and others, to provide readers with these 5 reasons why women entrepreneurs are more successful than men:

5 AREAS WHERE FEMALE ENTREPRENEURS ARE BETTER THAN MEN
1)    Female-Owned Firms Generate Higher Revenues
2)    Female-Owned Firms Create More Jobs Than Their Male-Owned Peers
3)    Women Executives Significantly Improve Startup Company Performance
4)    Women Are More Effective in Senior Leadership Roles
5)    Women Have a Larger Appetite for Growth

“There are a number of measures that suggest women are better at providing investment returns and creating new jobs than their male counterparts,” says Eric Noe, Editor-in-Chief, FitSmallBusiness.com.


About FitSmallBusiness.com:

With a rapidly growing monthly readership of more than 1.2 million, FitSmallBusiness.com is an online publication devoted to helping small business owners.  Its full-time staff of writers spends hours of research, data analysis, and interviews with industry experts to answer the questions that owners want in order to run a successful small business. 
For more information on this list and this topic, please contact Sarah Johnson, 194627@email4pr.com or 917-864-6355.

SOURCE FitSmallBusiness.com
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New College Ranking and Review Aggregator Publishes Top Consensus Ranked Women’s Colleges for 2018

College Consensus (https://www.collegeconsensus.com), a unique new college ratings website that aggregates publisher rankings and student reviews, has published their ranking of the Best Women’s Colleges 2018 at https://www.collegeconsensus.com/rankings/best-womens-colleges/.
To identify the Best Women’s Colleges for 2018, College Consensus combined the latest results from the most respected college rankings with thousands of real student reviews to produce a unique consensus score for each school. According to College Consensus founder Jeremy Alder, “Like Rotten Tomatoes or Metacritic does for movies, College Consensus gathers the publisher rankings and student reviews from around the web and distills the results into simple, easy to understand scores so students can quickly and easily compare schools. It is the ranking of all rankings, so to speak.” Learn more about the College Consensus rankings methodology at https://www.collegeconsensus.com/about/ .
To help prospective college students and their families evaluate the educational options open to them, College Consensus has identified the best women’s colleges, according to the combination of published rankings and student reviews. The top 10, out of more than 30, are:
1. Smith College – Northampton, MA
2. Wellesley College – Wellesley, MA
3. Scripps College – Claremont, CA
4. Bryn Mawr College – Bryn Mawr, PA
5. Barnard College – New York, NY
6. Cottey College – Nevada, MO
7. Mount Holyoke College – South Hadley, MA
8. College of Saint Benedict – St. Joseph, MN
9. Spelman College – Atlanta, GA
10. Simmons College – Boston, MA
“While nearly every other college and university today is coed, women’s colleges remain vibrant, exemplary, and essential to higher education,” Managing Editor Carrie Sealey-Morris explains. A large part of the reason is the fact that “Women are still underrepresented in the highest levels of leadership, from government to finance to entertainment to the tech industry, and we see the consequences daily.” The Consensus Best Women’s College ranking is intended to offer “a panoramic picture of the women’s college landscape” by focusing on the needs of students “looking for a women’s college to build the knowledge, expertise, skills, and confidence to take on the 21st century.” As Sealey-Morris explains, “Women’s colleges give young women of all backgrounds the opportunity to study in an affirming, encouraging community, with some of the most influential and accomplished women in the world.” For college-bound young women who want to walk in the footsteps of America’s great women leaders, the College Consensus ranking points in the right direction.

“College Consensus is designed as an aggregate ranking,” according to Managing Editor Carrie Sealey-Morris, “with a mission of providing prospective students and their families a clearer, more comprehensive view of college rankings.” College Consensus “evens the playing field by giving every perspective an equal voice,” as Sealey-Morris explains: “Unlike other rankings, which are limited by their methodologies […], there’s no gaming College Consensus.” With the College Consensus methodology “students get the data computed into a simple, single rating based on all other ratings, making it the fullest, most objective rankings out there.” By taking the long view, College Consensus can become an invaluable part of a prospective college student’s research process; as Sealey-Morris asserts, “Young women seeking the supportive, inclusive environment of an all-women’s college – from empowering academic programs to the networking power of robust alumni organizations – can look to College Consensus for the full picture.”

SOURCE College Consensus
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