Prepare for “The Talk” About Moving to Assisted Living

Talking to loved ones about assisted living can be tough. Many seniors resist this transition, often because they feel they’re being forced out of their homes and losing their independence.

Being prepared before a crisis arises, can remove some of the anxiety and uncertainty from the equation, making it easier for all involved. When it’s time to talk with your loved ones about moving into assisted living, the following tips can foster a healthy discussion.

1. Know the senior housing options. Before bringing up the topic, learn about the different types of senior living settings—especially in the state where your elder lives or may wish to relocate eventually.

2. Learn about your parents’ financial situation and options for funding the move and their ongoing care. For example, ask if they have purchased long-term care insurance. If Dad is a veteran, inquire about his service to see if he could be eligible for veterans benefits to help pay for long-term care.

3. Have the conversation in a casual, comfortable spot, like at the kitchen table. Start by saying, “I know this is hard to talk about, but I want to be sure that I honor your wishes.”

4. Promise to keep seniors involved in decisions. Everyone wants to be able to choose where they live and the kind of care they receive.

When the time is right, Liberty Residence gives residents every opportunity to keep active, stay involved and age gracefully.

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Consumers Can Shop Smart and Save This Back-to-School Season

Columbus, Ohio (July 27, 2017) Even though summer has just begun, pretty soon it’ll be time to focus on the school year ahead, and if your family is like most, you’re already thinking about purchasing school supplies for the upcoming year.

Back-to-school shopping is the second-largest consumer spending category after holiday shopping, according to statistics from the National Retail Federation and Research Now. An additional survey, conducted by Deloitte, found that 32 percent of families expect to spend more on school supplies this coming year, either because their children need more items, materials are increasing in price, or students need more expensive supplies.

Back-to-school expenses seem to climb every year and can be a strain on family budgets. In a 2016 survey conducted by the National Retail Federation, back-to-school spending has increased 55 percent over the past 10 years, with the average family spending $107.76 on school supplies. Combined with other expenses, such as clothing and accessories, electronics, and shoes, a family could end up spending an average of $674 on back-to-school shopping.

Despite rising costs, back-to-school shopping doesn’t have to be a budget-buster. A little pre-planning and early shopping can help you avoid extra spending. Nationally, 73 percent of back-to-school shoppers plan to shop a month to three weeks before the start of school.

Here are some ways you can shop smart during the back-to-school season:

Timing Matters: Look for end-of-summer sales and tax-free holidays, especially on big ticket items where you’ll really feel the savings. In Ohio, the tax-free holiday starts on Friday, Aug. 4, 2017, at 12:00 a.m. and ends Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. To learn more about this tax-free holiday weekend, visit the Ohio Department of Taxation website.

Plan Ahead: Before making new purchases, take an inventory of supplies you already have around the house. From there, make a list of items still needed. Two-thirds of consumers are likely to buy more than what is on their list, so be sure to stick to your shopping plan.

Avoid Fancy Supplies: Instead of spending money on the brightest, shiniest, and glitteriest supplies with a licensed logo, which adds to the cost, make them “Do It Yourself” art projects for your kids to decorate.

Use Technology to Bring Deals to Your Inbox: Let technology save you money by doing an online coupon search, monitor your favorite stores’ social media accounts to get advance notice of sales, and sign up for coupon links.

Stock Up: If you see a good deal on supplies you know will be an ongoing need, stock up so you’re ready when something runs out, gets lost, or breaks.

To learn about credit unions in your community and how they can help you plan for the back-to-school season, visit www.aSmarterChoice.org.

Source: Kimberly Stewart • Manager, Public Relations
Ohio Credit Union League
10 W. Broad St., Suite 1100 • Columbus, OH 43215
T: 800-486-2917, ext. 248 • D: 614-923-9748
www.OhioCreditUnions.org

Taking the Doctor-Patient Relationship to Heart

Screen Shot 2017-06-19 at 4.24.52 PMAs healthcare changes, a sustained relationship between a patient and their primary care doctor is more important today than ever. It is a fundamental and defining characteristic of primary care medicine. Likewise, as more of our population ages and more people develop chronic illnesses, the need for individualized care has dramatically increased. Three area medical doctors, Jennifer Carandang, Sheila Rice and Rebecca Ware, are tuned in to these needs and recently launched NorthShore Primary Care to enable a closer relationship with their patients.

With locations in Avon and Westlake, Drs. Carandang, Rice and Ware are dedicated to making sure each patient receives their undivided attention and an individualized care plan to help them achieve optimal health. All three hale from the west side of Cleveland and have earned a reputation as some of the area’s most highly regarded primary care physicians. In this independent internal medicine and pediatric practice, taking the time to meet and get to know each patient is a priority. Shorter face-to-face interactions could lead to missing important symptoms, misdiagnosing illnesses, and undermining their patient relationships.

“It’s very important to me to spend time building relationships with my patients,” says Dr. Ware. “Over the years, my practice has grown to see generations of families – the parents, kids, grandparents. You get to see the connections and the history. And that’s truly what primary care medicine should be.” Dr. Ware treats a wide range of conditions including diabetes, high cholesterol, hypertension, mood disorders, acute illnesses, and urinary tract infections. Prior to launching NorthShore Primary Care, she served as Medical Director of the Cleveland Clinic Lorain Family Health Center.

Dr. Rice grew up with a strong caregiving influence. “My mom was a nurse, and I’ve known since junior high that I loved science and loved trying to help people, says Dr. Rice. “I also love the challenge that comes with getting to the bottom of a patient’s symptomatology and the satisfaction of healing them and improving their quality of life. It’s why I love what I do every day.” Long-term doctor/patient relationships are part of NorthShore’s integrated approach to care. Dr. Rice specializes in women’s health, including routine gynecologiccare. She also earned and maintains special certifi cation in menopause management. She was recipient of the 2015 Cleveland Clinic Medicine Institute Outstanding Clinician award, the highest honor amongst community based internists in the system.

Dr. Carandang is dual certified in both primary care and pediatrics and trained to care for newborns, infants, children, and adolescents. She provides preventive care for healthy children and treats children who are injured or ill. She also specializes in childhood diseases, growth and emotional health, and treats a wide range conditions in adults including hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, asthma, and thyroid disorders. She has been named one of Cleveland Magazine’s Top Doctors as well as to the national Castle Connolly list of Exceptional Women in Medicine. “It’s such a joy to watch my pediatric patients as they grow,” says Dr. Carandang. “I’m happy to be a part of this practice because I simply want to be a doctor. I felt I was losing that, I was pushing too much paper. I love the feel of our office and that patients and parents can call and know who they are talking to. They trust us to do what is best for them and their children, and we take that very seriously.”

Primary care physicians are trained in the essentials of internal medicine, which incorporates an understanding of disease prevention, wellness, substance abuse, mental health, and effective treatment of common problems of the eyes, ears, skin, nervous system, and reproductive organs. These internists are trained in the diagnosis of cancer, infections and diseases affecting the heart, blood, kidneys, joints and the digestive, respiratory and vascular systems.

To make an appointment with Drs. Carandang or Rice, call the Avon office at 440.653.8091. To make an appointment with Dr. Ware in the Westlake office, call 440.250.7695. Learn more at www.northshorehealthcare.com.

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A look into the March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center Labs: Washington University/St. Louis

Circadian rhythms have a profound effect on metabolism, the immune system – and in the latest reserach from Drs. Herzog and Jungheim, maybe even preterm birth.

Screen Shot 2017-06-02 at 11.49.03 AMWe’ve long known that our circadian rhythms have profound effects on how — and especially when — we go about our daily lives. These cycles are influenced by the various intervals of light and darkness we experience over a 24-hour period, but also can be triggered by biological factors, our genetics and even our environment. The range of circadian impacts runs from relatively unnoticed, like our moods and ability to cope with stressors, to the most obvious, like when we are hungry or sleepy.

Circadian rhythms also have a profound effect on the onset of labor, with approximately 80% of women going into spontaneous labor between late night and early morning. And some studies have even shown that altering a pregnant woman’s circadian rhythms can disrupt the fetus’ growth and development. But could these rhythms also be a key factor in preterm birth? That’s exactly what a team of researchers at the March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center at Washington University in St. Louis are working on.

“The hypothesis we’re testing is that circadian rhythms in the mother, the fetus, or both, regulate birth timing, and when disrupted, may lead to preterm birth,” Dr. Herzog explained. “This chronodisruption, as it’s called, can be brought on by a number of factors, including shift work, exposure to artificial light, even irregular meals and sleep times. Our goal is to see how these disruptions influence preterm birth.”

The study has two parts. The first is to determine whether genetic or environmental disruptions of circadian rhythms lead to increased preterm birth risk in mice. The second part of the study is a pilot that will monitor and test 100 women pre- and post-conception to determine when disruption of the circadian rhythms of women with certain chronotypes, (e.g., larks vs. owls) increases their risk for preterm birth. The study will then be extended to 1000 women.

Also working on Theme Three at Washington University at St. Louis are Dr. Justin Fay, Ph.D., an associate professor of genetics, and Dr. Sarah K. England, a professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Dr. Jeff Gill, a professor of Political Science.

“By correlating the data we receive with genetic variations, we’ll also be able to trace any outcomes back to a woman’s specific biology,” said Dr. Fay, “to determine what role genetics plays in affecting circadian rhythm.”

Another leader working on this theme is Dr. Emily Jungheim. She sees the potential for the results of this research to positively affect the women in her practice.

“When I talk to young reproductive age women who are trying to have a child, the things that really speak to them are those they can do themselves to improve their outcomes,” she said. “They’re so motivated to do whatever they can to ensure they’re going to have a healthy start for their baby.”

And modifying those outcomes could be as simple as having a regularly scheduled bedtime.

For more information on prematurity research breakthroughs, we invite you to sign up for the Campaign to End Premature Birth newsletter.

Screen Shot 2017-06-02 at 11.52.17 AMwww.prematurityresearch.org
For more information on how you can be part of this effort, contact
philanthropy@marchofdimes.org

Source: March of Dimes 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue White Plains, NY 10605

Is independent living the right choice for you?

When you’re an older adult, any housing change can seem like you’re losing your independence. However, as the name suggests, independent living is more about making your life easier than giving up your independence. Sometimes, acknowledging your limitations—that you’re unable to manage the upkeep of your existing home, for example—and accepting some assistance now may help you maintain your regular independent routine for longer.

Is independent living right for me? – 4 Questions to ask yourself

1. How easy is it for me to maintain my current home?

Maintaining a home may be a longstanding source of pride for you, but it can also become a burden as you age. Perhaps your home has a large yard which requires constant maintenance, or maybe it’s becoming more difficult to clean those extra rooms that are rarely used. If your home is difficult to access, such as on a steep hill or up several flights of stairs, it may be harder for you to leave your home as often you’d like, leading to more isolation. Or increased crime may mean that your neighborhood is now too dangerous to walk around safely.

Some of these challenges may be partially remedied by hiring outside help, remodeling parts of your home, or by other family members lending assistance. However, if you’d like a place that does not require a lot of maintenance and upkeep, independent living may give you more freedom and flexibility in the long run.

2. Is it difficult for me to connect to friends and family?

The more isolated you are, the greater your risk for depression and other mental health problems. You may have a difficult time getting out of the house, perhaps due to trouble driving or increased mobility issues. Or your friends and neighbors may be busy with other work or family commitments, or the neighborhood may not be easy to get around. While the phone and Internet can help, nothing can take the place of face-to-face human connection.

Independent living facilities can give you a built-in social network of peers, while many also provide structured activities such as sports, arts, or field trips.

3. How easy is it for me to get around?

You may live in an area where you have to drive to attend social activities, visit friends, and shop. If you find yourself less comfortable with driving, you may find yourself relying more and more on public transportation or family and friends to get around. It may be harder to visit others, go to activities you enjoy, or keep doctors’ appointments.

As well as onsite amenities, many independent living or retirement communities also offer convenient transportation options to outside activities.

4. How is my health (and the health of my spouse)?

It’s important to consider your current and future health. For example, if you have a health condition that makes it difficult to stay active and will most likely worsen with time, it’s good to consider your options carefully. It’s also important to consider the health of your spouse if you are married. Can you manage the activities of daily living, such washing, showering, and eating? Can you manage your finances? Can you manage medications and doctor appointments?

If you see needing only minor assistance with activities of daily living, independent living may be right for you.

This article was provided by Liberty Residence

Screen Shot 2017-05-07 at 2.29.39 PMLiberty Residence
330-336-3616
250 Smokerise Dr.
Wadsworth, OH 44281
www.titansenquest.com/liberty-residence-independent-living



 

 

 

Your Child’s Mouthwash Might Be Putting Harmful Substances In Their Bodies

3 Questionable Ingredients Found In Oral Health Care Products

Consumers have become increasingly aware of the hidden toxins in foods, beverages as well as eating and drinking utensils. They avoid high fat and high sodium foods, sulfates in their personal care products, aerosol sprays and toxic chemicals in their household cleaners.

Yet, when it comes to mouthwash, they will let their children take a product that contains harsh substances – some of which have been shown to linked to serious health problems.

“There has been a surprising lack of attention to mouthwash and how it affects children,” says Dr. Harold Katz (www.therabreath.com), a bacteriologist, dentist and developer of TheraBreath for Kids Oral Rinse. “Effects of potentially unhealthy ingredients are multiplied in the smaller bodies of children.”

Many ingredients in some commercial mouthwashes are of questionable benefit and some are just plain bad for you. Here is a look at some of the harmful substances that may be found in our children’s mouthwash products:

• Sodium Lauryl Sulfate. This harsh detergent leads to canker sores and causes microscopic damage and shedding of vital oral tissue. Because it dries out the mouth, it can also allow for the rapid reproduction of bad breath bacteria. 

• Saccharin. This sweetener is found in drinks, candy, cookies and medicines. It has also been shown to cause bladder cancer when tested on laboratory rats. In humans, it can cause allergy-related symptoms, skin disorders, nausea and diarrhea.

• Artificial Colors and Flavors. Studies by leading health researchers have found a link between children’s use of artificial colors and flavors with learning disabilities and hyperkinesis (hyperactivity and inability to concentrate).

Katz suggests that all consumers – especially parents – take the time to read labels and understand what is going into their children’s bodies. Spending a few extra minutes reading these labels, and understanding what the substances are could be a life-saving decision.

About the Author
Dr. Harold Katz (www.therabreath.com) received his degree in bacteriology from UCLA and is the founder of The California Breath Clinics and author of “The Bad Breath Bible.” He has been featured on ABC’s “Good Morning America,” CBS’s “Early Show” and “The View” with Barbara Walters and countless other TV shows. Dr. Katz has developed oxygenating compounds that have been used by millions around the world to eliminate bad breath. He is also the bearer of the now famous “Halimeter,” which tests the sulfur compounds in the mouth that cause bad breath. Dr. Katz’ website   offers a free online bad breaths test – as well as a sneaky way to tell someone they have halitosis.

Source:
Brittany Thomas: 727-443-7115 ext 221
Print Campaign Manager
News and Experts
Brittany@newsandexperts.com

10 Things to Do with a Finnbin Baby Box Once Baby Grows Out

Finnbin is a baby box company inspired by the Kela (Finland social security program) maternity package that grants a kit to all expectant or adoptive parents who live in Finland. Finnbin goal is to make life easier for new parents by helping them prepare for their baby by introducing great brands with quality products and providing babies with a safe place to sleep. They are excited to bring this beloved and age-old Finnish tradition to families throughout the U.S.
Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 8.43.03 AMWhile your baby may only be able to sleep in his or her Finnbin box up to six months, that doesn’t mean you need to ditch the box once your baby graduates to the crib. Here are the top 10 ideas for what you can do with your Finnbin box after the baby moves out of it:

  1. Keepsake box: use it to keep memorable items you’ll always want to remember the early days with your baby. A favorite hat, blankie, or boox. You can add to it as your little one grows up.
  2. Next-size-up clothing: use the box to put the next side up clothes that your little one may not quite fit into yet, but will soon. That way they’ll be organized and easy to access once a growth spurt comes along.
  3. Cleaning supplies: Keep your cleaning supplies, sprays and soaps out of reach for kiddos but placing them in the box and putting in a pantry or on a high shelf. This also makes it easy when you’re in cleaning mode to bring all your supplies in a quick and organized way.
  4. Road trip survival box: If you’re packing up the kids and hitting the road, put all the things they’ll want in the box and make it easy for them to access in the backseat so you can have a little sanity up front.
  5. Art box: as your baby gets bigger and begins to make art, this is a perfect box to collect those one-of-a-kind treasures to keep for a long time.
  6. Important files: The box fits multiple file folders and as your child grows, you’ll accumulate materials along the way (birth certificate, hospital records, school files, etc…). This is a recognizable and large enough space to store all the important docs needed for your child.
  7. Game night: Keep your board games, cards, dice and other game night essentials in the box so not pieces are lost and it’s easy to take down for a fun night of games.
  8. Toy box: Quick! Guests are coming over and you have a hundred mini-race cars all over your living room. Grab your box and use it for quick toy storage that can hide a mess in a matter of minutes.
  9. DIY galore: Crafting is a great activity as your child gets bigger and keeping all those DIY materials in one place will ensure you have a mess-free home! From paper to popsicle sticks to googly-eyes, keep them in your box and know when you take it out, fun lies ahead.
  10. Magazine storage: keep magazines and newsletters in the box to easily access when you have a little downtime (ha!) to catch up on reading. When the magazines start to overflow the boxes that’s when you throw out what’s in there and start over.

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Article & Photos Provided By Finnbin.com

PREVENTING OVERUSE INJURIES AND HOW TO TREAT THEM

While practice makes perfect, practicing too hard or training incorrectly can lead to overuse injuries. Caused by a repetitive stress to a muscle, bone or tendon, overuse injuries can be subtle and develop over time. You may begin to feel chronic pain even at rest. Common examples include tendinitis, shin splints or bursitis.

Overuse injuries happen to people of all ages, but can be especially common for student athletes when they take on too much, too soon, or have poor form. When the body does not have enough time to recover, the breakdown of tissue happens faster than the buildup that occurs when exercise is done properly.

“Growing bones can be less resilient to stress, putting children and teens at increased risk,” said Aaron Wolkoff, DO, Orthopedic Specialist and Medical Director of GO Ortho. “Student athletes should avoid excessive training programs, be sure to get a yearly physical, and avoid specializing in one sport before they reach puberty.”

Overuse injuries can be prevented by keeping good form and listening to your body when something starts to hurt. “You must practice proper technique and give your body ample time to rest,” said Dr. Wolkoff. To relieve minor aches or sprains at home, Dr. Wolkoff recommends icing and elevating the injury. You may also try a compression wrap or take ibuprofen for the pain.

AN ALTERNATIVE TO THE ER

If the pain from an injury seems unmanageable, many believe they need to go to the emergency room. But the ER is primarily designed to serve life-threatening emergencies. An urgent care center may be able to help you, but you will likely be seen by a generalist—not an orthopedic specialist. In both cases, you will walk out with a referral to have a second appointment with a specialist.

Fortunately, there are orthopedic urgent care centers such as GO Ortho. GO Ortho is an independent practice that cares for a wide range of orthopedic conditions from acute pain resulting from a break or overuse injury, to chronically painful conditions like arthritis. This facility is staffed by orthopedic specialists and accepts walk-ins and same-day appointments. This enables patients to get in with a specialist to take care of their pain much sooner than typical orthopedic offices, which may not have an open appointment for weeks.

Because you are seeing an orthopedic specialist, conditions are more accurately diagnosed and properly treated. GO Ortho staff are trained to provide sophisticated treatments, advanced orthopedic imaging, and outfit patients in the latest in slings, braces, casting and other support devices.

“Our goal is to change the delivery of medical care. We help families avoid the hospital or emergency room to receive the immediate care they need, directly from a specialist,” said Dr. Wolkoff. There is also a significant monetary savings to the patient since a GO Ortho visit is charged as a regular orthopedic office visit and not as an ER/emergency level visit that may come with a high cost to the patient. GO Ortho see patients age one and up and accepts most major insurance carriers.

“While we do advocate going to the ER when you are faced with a severe medical problem, most orthopedic pains and conditions are not life threatening and are best treated by an orthopedic specialist. The fastest way to see one is to go to GO Ortho,” said Dr. Wolkoff. GO Ortho is located at the Hillcrest Hospital Medical Office Building, Suite 410. Learn more at www.godoctornow.com.

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Malnutrition Dramatically Impacting Mothers & Infants Across America

WASHINGTON, Sept. 14, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — 1,000 Days, a leading nutrition advocacy organization, released a new report today showing that the majority of children in America do not benefit from the nutrition they need for proper brain development and lifelong health.

The report, titled The First 1,000 Days: Nourishing America’s Future, finds that malnutrition is not just a challenge for mothers and babies globally—unhealthy diets, suboptimal infant and toddler feeding practices, and food insecurity have dire consequences for the health and prosperity of families in the United States. The report specifically focuses on the 1,000 days between a woman’s pregnancy and a child’s second birthday, when the right nutrition has a life-changing impact on a child’s ability to grow, learn and succeed.
“The science behind the impact of poor nutrition during the first 1,000 days is clear. This is a time of incredible growth for children’s brains and bodies and they need to be fueled with good nutrition,” said Lucy Sullivan, Executive Director of 1,000 Days. “All children, regardless of where they are born, deserve a strong start in life and the opportunity to reach their full potential. We are committed to ensuring women and children everywhere have the healthiest first 1,000 days, and that includes women and children here in the United States.”

1,000 Days has issued a set of recommendations where greater action and investment can have a transformative impact on the future health and well-being of America’s youngest children. Among other priorities, the organization is calling for:

  • Increased support for healthy pregnancies by ensuring access to high quality preconception and prenatal care, nutrition education and obesity prevention programs;
  • Improved support for mothers to breastfeed by creating breastfeeding-friendly communities, workplaces and healthcare facilities; and
  • Strengthened programs that reach low-income babies, toddlers and their families.

“Nutrient deficiency is robbing children of their potential,” said Hugh Welsh, President and General Counsel of DSM North America, a manufacturer of nutritional and food ingredients. “It is time to focus on nourishing our country’s youngest children—the health and well-being of our nation depends on it.”

Among the findings, the report identifies ten building blocks essential for all children to have the strongest start to life, including:

  • A nutritious diet for expectant moms and moms-to-be
    A healthy baby starts with a healthy mother, however half of American women enter pregnancy either obese or overweight and nearly half gain more weight during pregnancy than is recommended.
  • Nurturing, responsive care and feeding of babies and toddlers  
    Less than half of mothers receive any paid time off to care for their newborn. Paid parental leave can reduce infant mortality and illness, increase the likelihood of timely pediatric care, improve breastfeeding practices, and reduce the likelihood of maternal depression which impacts mothers’ ability to nourish and nurture their children.
  • Consistent access to enough nutritious food for families
    Nearly 1 in 5 children under the age of 6 live in families that struggle to put enough nutritious food on the table. Family food insecurity negatively impacts young children’s development, even when the children themselves have enough to eat. Household food insecurity also makes it harder for mothers to maintain healthy diets and healthy weights.

A full list of the building blocks and a snapshot of how the U.S. is faring is available here: http://thousanddays.org/tdays-content/uploads/StandaloneCharts-2_Scorecard-Logo.pdf

The full list of recommendations can be found here:
http://thousanddays.org/tdays-content/uploads/StandaloneCharts-3_Wins-Logo.pdf

To read and download the full report, visit:
http://thousanddays.org/resource/nourishing-americas-future

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About 1,000 Days  
1,000 Days is the leading non-profit advocacy organization working in the U.S. and around the world to improve nutrition, particularly during the 1,000 day window between a woman’s pregnancy and her child’s 2nd birthday, when the right nutrition has a life-changing impact on a child’s future. 1,000 Days promotes greater action and investment in nutrition in order to build a strong foundation for children, their families and their nations to thrive. To learn more visit www.thousanddays.org.

Why Choose a Pediatric Dentist?

Your child not only has a different development and arrangement of their teeth than adults, but may have specific dental and behavioral needs that are unique to a child. These needs may include dental sealants, fluoride applications, home treatments, or just simply education in oral hygiene. In addition to treating existing dental problems, our office focuses on prevention through patient education. Our mission is to give our patients the best and most advanced dental care possible to enjoy a cavity-free future.

Natural Dentistry! No Needles! No Drills! No Pain!

With cutting edge technology like the dental laser, Brunswick KiDDS uses this laser energy and a gentle spray of water to perform a wide range of dental procedures, without the vibration and pressure associated with the dental drill which are the primary causes of pain. Doctors have used lasers for years to provide better care for their patients.

Now, thanks to Brunswick KiDDS, you can benefit from advanced laser technology for your child’s dental care. Without the use of the drill, our lasers allow us to perform many dental procedures without shots, without the need for anesthesia, and without any numbing at all! Also, our lasers reduce the amount of bleeding, post-operative pain, swelling, and the need for pain medication after treatment! Brunswick KiDDS’ Lasers are extremely precise and accurate in their ability to remove tooth decay. Since they use light energy, they can eliminate even microscopic amounts of bacteria and infection while leaving surrounding areas unaffected. As a result, we can often treat all areas of decay in one or two appointments, reducing the amount of anxiety that build up every time your child has to come back for treatment! It is the natural way of doing dentistry.

Have You Had Your Child Evaluated for Braces?

The American Association for Orthodontists recommends that every child have an orthodontic evaluation by the age of 7. Early detection and treatment gives your child the edge – a much better chance for natural and normal development. One advantage of having Brunswick KiDDS for your child’s dental home is that we monitor their growth and development on a regular basis. Our parents truly appreciate having orthodontic treatment done in our office. This allows them to coordinate cleaning and check-up appointments with orthodontic appointments. By working with the natural growth instead of against it, we can prevent problems from becoming worse, and give your child a lifetime of healthy smiles! Studies have shown that people who have straight healthy teeth are more likely to smile more. This can lead to a greater self-esteem which may lead to a more fulfilling life.

Dr. Milton and Dr. Brittany are pediatric dentists, specializing in the treatment and prevention of dental disease, as well as the overall oral health of children. Through extra years of schooling, training, experience, and certification, a pediatric dentist is uniquely qualified to treat the dental needs of infants, children, adolescents, and those with special health care needs. Dr. Milton, Dr. Brittany and their team regularly attend seminars and conferences devoted to new treatments, new technologies and excellent patient care practices.

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