Applications Now Being Accepted for Fall 2017 WomenHeart Science & Leadership Symposium at Mayo Clinic

Hospitals Encouraged to Nominate Patients for Nationally-Renowned Training Program for Women Living with Heart Disease

The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease has announced that applications are now being accepted for the Fall 2017 WomenHeart Science & Leadership SymposiumThe Symposium is taking place October 6-October 9, 2017 at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. The application deadline is July 31, 2017.

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The four-day Symposium brings together dedicated female heart patients and provides a rigorous training for them to be WomenHeart Champions — patient volunteers who work in their local communities to lead support network meetings with heart disease survivors and/or participate in other WomenHeart education and advocacy activities.

“Education, advocacy and support are at the core of the fight against heart disease in women. WomenHeart Champions trained at this prestigious program are equipped to improve awareness, increase action and lead peer support efforts in their local communities,” said Mary McGowan, CEO of WomenHeart.

McGowan referenced research that underscores the impact of peer support in helping women improve their heart disease outcomes.

“So many women experience feelings of fear, anxiety and isolation following a heart disease diagnosis. However, women who regularly attend a support group led by a trained peer leader are more engaged in their health care and experience lower levels of stress, anxiety and depression,” she said. “This is just one example of the real impact made by participating in the WomenHeart Science & Leadership Symposium, and we’re so proud to see the difference it makes in each WomenHeart Champion‘s local community.”

Members of WomenHeart’s National Hospital Alliance are encouraged to nominate patients that they believe would be would be best suited for this leadership opportunity. The organization is also seeking nominations from hospitals not currently affiliated with the National Hospital Alliance, as well as directly from women living with heart disease. Patients are asked to complete a short survey to begin the application process.

WomenHeart was founded in 1999 and the Science & Leadership Symposium at Mayo Clinic was founded as an integral part of WomenHeart in 2002. WomenHeart currently boasts more than 800 WomenHeart Champions and 97 WomenHeart Support Networks that reach more than 10,000 women heart patients nationwide every year.

WomenHeart National Hospital Alliance
The WomenHeart National Hospital Alliance is currently comprised of 40 member hospitals. It is a unique partnership between WomenHeart and member hospitals throughout the country who are dedicated to advancing women’s heart health in their community. The National Hospital Alliance was developed by WomenHeart to ensure that women heart disease patients in every community have access to information, education and patient support services.

WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease
WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease is the nation’s only patient centered organization serving the almost 48 million American women living with or at risk for heart disease – the leading cause of death for women. WomenHeart is devoted to advancing women’s heart health through advocacy, community education, and the nation’s only patient support network solely for women living with heart disease. WomenHeart is both a coalition and a community of thousands of members nationwide, including women heart patients and their families, healthcare professionals, and health advocates, all committed to helping women live longer, healthier lives. To join or donate, visit www.womenheart.org.

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Three Keys to a Healthy Heart

When you think of February, what comes to mind? Chocolate? Roses? Love?  is February, we’re thinking about your heart. February is heart health month and a great opportunity to take stock of the health of your heart.

The FACTS:

If you ask Americans what disease they fear most, they’ll likely say cancer. But there’s a killer even more prevalent than cancer…Heart Disease. According to the CDC, heart disease is the number one killer in America. More women die from heart disease than all forms of cancer combined! Men are 2 to 5 times more likely to have coronary heart disease than premenopausal women. But once women reach menopause, their risk is similar to a man’s. Heart disease is a greater threat than cancer. Now for the good news: heart disease is nearly 95% preventable! YES, PREVENTABLE!

ARE YOU TAKING CARE OF YOUR HEART?

There are three key components to heart health: nutrition, blood sugar level, and exercise. When these areas are monitored and kept in check, you can drastically reduce your chances of ever having heart disease.

Nutrition. What you eat (or don’t eat) directly impacts your cardiovascular health. Your blood vessels and heart have a cell lining called the endothelium. The endothelial cells play a critical role in the tone and health of your blood vessels because they produce nitric oxide. Nitric oxide causes your blood vessels to enlarge, which increases the flow of blood through those vessels, helping blood to flow as though the walls of the vessels are slippery. The best way to keep the endothelial cells healthy is by eating plenty of leafy greens, which contain a rich supply of the amino acid L-arginine, the building block of nitric oxide.

Blood Sugar Level. Your blood sugar level measures how much glucose is circulating in your bloodstream and is directly related to the amount of simple carbohydrates that you consume. Over time, chronic high levels of blood sugar increase your risk of heart disease in different ways:
1. Damage and in ammation of the heart. The higher your average blood sugar, the thicker the walls of your heart become.
2. Hardening of the arteries and high blood pressure. High blood sugar levels cause plaque to build up inside your arteries, increasing your risk of a heart attack. The plaque causes your arteries to be stiff and unable to dilate properly causing your heart to work harder to push blood through your sti and narrowed arteries—this is called high blood pressure. To keep your blood glucose levels in check, eat a diet focused on lean proteins, plenty of vegetables, some fruit, and nuts. Limit sugar, white rice and refined flours. Strength train twice a week; intense exercise helps to drive glucose out of your blood and into your muscles where it can be used for energy.

Exercise is a critical part of having a healthy heart. The benefits of a well-designed cardiovascular training routine are pretty obvious, but many don’t realize how important strength training is for heart health. It builds muscle and helps keep your weight down, and also makes your heart stronger.

Weight Control. Being overweight puts you at high risk for heart disease. When you carry around excess fat, your heart has to work harder. It enlarges as it works harder and becomes less efficient. Eventually, this reduction in e ciency culminates in heart disease. As you strength train, you increase the muscle mass in your body, which helps to burn o extra fat, easing the burden on your heart.

Strong Heart. High-Intensity Strength Training, like we do at MaxStrength Fitness, also increases your heart rate, which pushes your heart to become more efficient causing you to grow more capillaries. The result is a heart that is strong and efficient.

This February, make a decision to take care of your heart! If you need help getting your heart health optimized give us a call at 440.835.9090 or go to www.maxstrengthfitness.com to request your free initial consultation and demo workout today!

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