Best Foods for Healthy Skin

We’ve said it time and time again: what you put into your body has a major impact on what appears on the outside.

“Skin is the largest organ in our body and reflects our overall well-being”, says Ringaile Sirvaitis, Certified Nurse Practitioner at Apex Dermatology in Concord. “The foods and drinks we consume directly impact what our skin looks like on a day-to-day basis. Nutrition has a very strong correlation with various skin conditions such as acne, premature aging, and other inflammatory skin conditions.”

This is why it’s not always wise to only rely on external medicines in order to aid skin conditions, but rather to use them in unison with foods that can support healthy skin from the inside out.

About Ringaile Sirvaitis, CNP

Born in Lithuania, she has resided in the United States since 1999. In addition to English, she is fluent in Lithuanian and Russian. For many years, her passion and interests were focused on health, and more specifically, on beautiful skin.

Ringaile says, “It gives me huge satisfaction to see my patients looking and feeling better.”

During her advanced nursing training she studied in the dermatology department of Cleveland Clinic. Her diverse background and expertise in skin care gives her an excellent platform for sharing her knowledge and educating patients about the preservation, nurture, and well being of the skin.

And that includes which foods and drinks can help your skin in the long run.

What foods are good for skin overall?

Your skin is comprised of many layers and in order to properly care for them, they need nutrients that supports them.

When you want to buy foods and drinks that are good for your skin look for:

  • Fatty fish – such as salmon (wild-caught better than farm-raised to avoid hormones and antibiotics), mackerel, herring, sardines. These fish are rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids that act as building blocks for healthy skin cells and maintain a healthy skin barrier.
  • Eggs – are protein rich and contain biotin, a B vitamin that is essential for healthy hair, skin and nails
  • Grass-fed meat that does not contain hormones or antibiotics
  • Vegetables, such as dark leafy greens, spinach, broccoli, green beans, peppers, sweet potato, tomato, carrots, squash, pumpkin – contain antioxidants, minerals and vitamins as well as fiber.
  • Fruits – lemon, papaya, avocado, orange, watermelon, honeydew, mango, pomegranate, apple, kiwi, apricot, banana, organic berries (blueberries, raspberries, goji berries, acai berries, cranberries, strawberries, bilberries) – contain antioxidants, are rich in vitamins and minerals, are anti-inflammatory and high in fiber.
  • Mushrooms – rich in vitamin D
  • Whole grains, beans and legumes – high in B-group vitamins, iron, calcium, phosphorus, zinc and magnesium. Good source of folate. Low in saturated fat.
  • Almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, sunflower, sesame and pumpkin seeds – contain natural fatty acids and vitamin E that helps to increase skin hydration and keeps away wrinkles and fine lines.
  • Green tea contains antioxidant EGCG that fights DNA damage from UV rays to prevent skin cancer. Also has anti-inflammatory effect improving skin tone and reducing acne.
  • Water has ability to flush toxins from our system, keeps our skin clean, well hydrated and more youthful.

What foods and drinks are bad for your skin?

It’s just as, if not more, important to understand which foods and drinks can also hurt you in your quest for perfect skin.

These are foods and beverages you should consume in moderation if you want to maintain healthy skin:

  • Refined carbohydrates – white flour foods such as white bread, pasta and white rice have a high glycemic index. This causes an insulin surge after consumption and leads to production of androgen hormones that cause sebaceous glands to produce more oil and cause acne.
  • Sugar/corn syrup – soda, juices, sport drinks, protein-granola bars cause inflammation and destruction of collagen and elastin in the skin that leads to wrinkles and premature aging and also same mechanism as with refined carbs, where an increase in serum insulin leads to more oil production by sebaceous glands and the overproduction of oil leads to clogged pores and acne.
  • Dairy products – high inflammatory food that will contribute to skin conditions such as acne, eczema and wrinkles.
  • Overconsumption of alcohol – pro-inflammatory, causes dehydration, increases likelihood of broken capillaries due to skin vasodilation, increases skin dullness and wrinkle formation.

To read more about the Best Foods for Healthy Skin click here to check out the Apex Skin Blog.

Hormones Protect Our Heart

By Tara D. Scott, MD, FACOG, FAAFM, ABOIM, CNMP

My struggle with hormones and infertility prompted me to start studying a holistic approach and eventually led to me completing a fellowship in functional medicine and getting another board certification in Integrative Medicine.

When people hear that we specialize in hormones we usually get mixed reviews. One camp still believes that hormones cause cancer, which stems from a study in 2002 called the Women’s Health Initiative that studied a synthetic form of hormone replacement (HRT) and found that in women over 65 there was an increased risk of blood clots and breast cancer. Since then, other studies have proven that the risk of blood clots is only with oral estrogen, so we never prescribe estrogen in an oral form. Furthermore, another study in Europe in 2008 observed that there was no increased risk of breast cancer in women aged 40-64 who took estrogen through the skin in a patch or a cream form, and a bio-identical form of progesterone. They compared this group to a group of women who took no hormones at all. So, the type of hormone and the way you take it, and the dose, all come into play. So you need someone who is an expert to manage your hormone replacement if you choose to take it.

Aside from the confusing data about the risks of HRT, we need to remember that the #1 killer in women is heart disease. Also, the studies are pretty clear that estrogen is protective of heart disease, that’s why we don’t see women dying of sudden heart attacks before 50 as often as we see that with men. Moreover, let’s not forget that the DEATH rate two years after a hip fracture is higher than TEN years after breast cancer diagnosis, so osteoporosis is very serious. Estrogen has been shown in many studies to slow bone loss and help osteoporosis.

However, aside from risks & benefits of HRT, I would advocate for everyone to KNOW their hormones. That means you should be aware before and after menopause what your levels are. I see many women that have much too high of estrogen levels that are at increased risk for cancers of the breast or uterus. Knowing their levels, we can craft a plan for prevention.

There are many ways to test hormone levels. Traditional blood testing helps us see what your ovaries are producing, but saliva levels are best to test the stress hormone cortisol or to see what your tissues are exposed to. For example, a blood test is like your balance for your checking account at that very moment. It doesn’t take into account if you are getting deposits or withdrawals. So if I’m an accountant, I won’t just look at your balance, I will look at your checkbook, your receipts, and how much you have been paid to make an assessment. Urine testing lets us see how your body is processing hormones and make sure you aren’t stockpiling estrogen, which would be bad. So, even if you don’t think you need hormones, you should get tested to make sure you are in balance!

We can help you get your life back too.

Preventive Care is Essential for Women

Medina County Health Department offers health services, screenings, and treatments to live a longer, healthier life so you can be there for your family.

AN ESTIMATED 66% OF CAREGIVERS ARE FEMALE.

Women provide the majority of informal care to spouses, parents, parents-in-law, friends and neighbors, and they play many roles while caregiving—hands-on health provider, care manager, friend, companion, surrogate decision-maker and advocate. We need to care for ourselves to care for others! Source: caregiver.org

Provided By Medina County Health Department

Our mission at the Medina County Health Department is to prevent disease, assure a healthful environment, prolong life, and promote the well-being of the citizens of Medina County. Many of our services and programs focus on educating all citizens, but we also recognize that women experience unique health issues and conditions.

The Health Department has a full-time family practice physician, a full-time family nurse practitioner, and a certified nurse midwife who are all trained to provide complete services for women. General physicals, breast and cervical cancer screenings, low cost reproductive health care, and consultation for gynecological issues are just some of the services available.

Regular health exams and tests can help and problems before they start. Some health issues that are common to both men and women affect women differently, so it is important to work with a provider who recognizes this and works with you as an individual. By getting the right health services, screenings, and treatments you are taking steps for living a longer, healthier life. For women of reproductive age it is especially important to address issues such as high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and substance abuse, which may affect future fertility, pregnancies, and birth outcomes.

The Health Center at the Medina County Health Department accepts private insurance, Medicare plans and all Medicaid plans. Our staff is committed to your health.

Hours of Service: Same day appointments available. 
8:00am to 4:30pm on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday
8:00am to 7:00pm on Tuesday 
8:00am to 2:00pm on Friday

 

Holiday Survival Guide: How to Get Through the Holidays with No Regrets

By Jeff Tomaszewski, Chief Life Transformer, MaxStrength Fitness

Let’s face it: it is hard to stick to a healthy eating and exercise plan during the holidays. Everywhere we turn there are tempting foods and drinks—from treats at office parties to our own traditional family favorites. When you add in a busy schedule filled with shopping and get-togethers that make it tough to squeeze in exercise, you have a recipe for disaster as far as our scales are concerned.

The good news is that you really can get through the holidays without gaining weight. It will take some effort, but you will thank yourself a thousand times when January 1 rolls around and you have no regrets!

Your Goal:  Maintenance

In order to greet the New Year without tipping the scale, it is wise to try to maintain your weight during the next few months instead of trying to lose. Remember:  you want to enjoy the holidays, not be miserable from deprivation. This means that you will allow yourself occasional treats and splurges and keep the scale where it is rather than trying to actually decrease your weight.

There are several ways to accomplish this:

• Don’t skip your workouts. To get the biggest bang for your exercise-buck, do regular strength training moves. Even after your strength training session has ended, your metabolism and calorie-burn remains high when you do strength training! You need this calorie-burn to keep up with the richer food that you will be eating. You will also be less likely to overeat if you have just pushed through a hard workout!

• Eat breakfast. People who eat breakfast consume fewer calories throughout the day than those who skip this important meal.

• Keep a food diary. Write down every single thing you eat—even if it is only one bite of shrimp cocktail. It is a proven fact that keeping a food journal results in better weight control than not keeping one. (Tip: don’t want to write it down? Snap a picture!)

• Monitor your hunger. Never show up at a party or buffet ravenous—you will most certainly overeat. Drink water and have a protein-filled snack (such as nuts, yogurt, cottage cheese, or cheese) before arriving. This will help you have more self-control around the temptations.

• Weigh yourself twice each week. Normally it is not a good idea to step on the scale too often, but during the holidays it’s a great way to stay on track with your goals. If you see the scale start to creep, you can immediately take steps to correct it, such as backing off your calories for a day or two, drinking more water, and adding in a little more exercise.

• Watch your portion size. If you have an idea of how much food you are putting on your plate, you will be less likely to overdo it.

• Deal quickly with leftovers. If you have unhealthy leftovers in your home, you are likely to indulge. Don’t leave them sitting around. Freeze them, give them away or toss them. It’s not worth the temptation!

• Check in with your future self. Every day, speak to yourself from the future—say, from January 1. Thank yourself for doing the tough work of self-discipline during these holiday weeks. You might say something like this: Thank you! I feel great! I’m no heavier than I was in November, I’ve stayed on track with my exercise, my energy is incredible, and I’ve got the momentum to spend the rest of the winter getting in even better shape before spring gets here!

• Go public. Sound scary? It’s supposed to! Let others know what your current weight is and check in with them each time you weigh yourself. That kind of intense accountability will give you will power when the cheesecake and fudge starts showing up at the office!

You can survive the holidays with no added weight gain. Remember these tips and keep a vision of what you want to feel like on January 1 in mind. It’s going to be a great holiday season!

Be strong, eat clean, and live well—BONUS: Download our FREE Holiday Survival Guide at www.maxstrengthfitness.com/holiday.

If It Doesn’t Hurt…..

By Dr. Scott L. Rose

I am not sure who came up with that saying, but whoever did is probably partly responsible for a lot of pain and misery. The human body is an amazing thing, but one perceived flaw is that when something is wrong it may not always cause pain, illness, or discomfort. I don’t think this is a flaw, but really part of a very well thought out design. If every time something hurts we would just react to that situation, there would be little reason to do otherwise. No pain can be a dangerous illusion.   Understanding this should lead one to be an active participant in their health. We should always be working towards leading a healthier life with the key words of “working towards.” Health is not a destination, it’s an ongoing journey. And one of the best things you can do for yourself is preventative care.

Concerning oral health, there are so many things people CAN do, but unfortunately don’t. Many people think that absence of discomfort is absence of dental issues, until something painful happens. By that time, treatment options become limited, more expensive, and more time consuming. It’s sad, but I see this every day. What I suggest to patients is an Oral Wellness Plan. A plan that sees what is good and builds upon that; a plan that looks for potential problems and stops them from beginning. And a plan that takes existing problems and fixes them before they become larger issues.

Choose a dentist/healthcare provider who is willing to work not only on you, but with you; someone who will take a holistic approach and a wholistic approach is an important step in the right direction. I think a good ending to the opening phrase would be:

“If it doesn’t hurt…it’s a good time to make a plan to keep healthy and pain free.”

New ACR/SBI Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines Call for Significant Changes to Screening Process

Assign Special Status and Approach for African-American and Other Women at High-Risk for Breast Cancer

 

New American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) breast cancer screening guidelines are the first to recognize that African-American women are at high-risk for the disease and should be screened as such. The ACR and SBI now call for all women to have a risk assessment at age 30 to see if screening earlier than age 40 is needed. The societies also newly-recommend that women previously diagnosed with breast cancer be screened with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

The ACR and SBI continue to recommend that women at average breast cancer risk begin screening at age 40.

“The latest scientific evidence overwhelmingly supports a continued general recommendation of starting annual screening at age 40. It also supports augmented and earlier screening for many women. These updates will help save more lives,” said Debra Monticciolo, MD, FACR, chair of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Commission.

According to 2015 National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data, since mammography became widespread in the 1980s, the U.S. breast cancer death rate in women, unchanged for the previous 50 years, has dropped 43 percent.  Breast cancer deaths in men, who have the same treatment as women but are not screened, have not declined.

Factors that contributed to the ACR/SBI reclassification of African-American women include that:
  • African-American women are 42 percent more likely to die from breast cancer than non-Hispanic white women despite roughly equal incidence rates
  • African-American women have a two-fold higher risk of aggressive — “triple-negative” — breast tumors
  • African-American women are less likely to be diagnosed with stage I breast cancer, but twice as likely to die of early breast cancers
  • African-American women have a higher risk of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations than those of Western European ancestry. These carriers are at much higher risk for breast cancer.

“Since 1990, breast cancer death rates dropped 23 percent in African-American women — approximately half that in whites. We changed our approach to help save more African-American women and others at higher risk from this deadly disease,” said Wendy B. DeMartini, MD, FSBI.

For more information regarding the proven effectiveness of regular mammography screening at reducing breast cancer deaths, please visit RadiologyInfo.org, MammographySavesLives.org and EndTheConfusion.org.

 

SOURCE American College of Radiology

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It Takes Courage To Seek Help

Today, good health goes beyond exercise and diet—it also encompasses what goes on in our mind. When we are feeling depressed or anxious, our bodies react. Over time, this can lead to health problems. There is a story about a wise old doctor whose patient came to see him and said she was depressed. The doctor’s reaction was surprising to her. He said, “That’s good. Now that you know there’s something wrong, you need to make a change in your life!”

Today, women face many issues that can impact their emotional and mental health. This may include how to adjust to changing roles (such as breadwinner wives and stay at home dads), online dating, the choice of whether or not to have children and many more concerns.

When women need help, they often seek counseling. The job of a counselor is to guide patients through the process of addressing issues and creating change in their life. Counselors are taught to remain objective, and what is said to them remains private. There are a variety of options for counseling. Depending on the needs of the patient, counseling may include individual or group sessions, or both.

Sometimes, women are afraid to admit they have an issue and resort to means other than counseling to change how they feel. They may drink too much or use drugs to lessen the mental pain they are experiencing. When these individuals stop using a substance, they are flooded with emotions that are difficult to deal with alone.

It takes courage to seek help but realizing that professional resources are available can help you address the issues in your life and make the necessary changes to become the best version of you. If you would like to learn more about counseling, Southwest General’s Oakview Behavioral Health Services offers an assessment to help determine if you can benefit from group or individual counseling.

To learn more, or to schedule an assessment, call 440-816-8200.

Healthy Mouth ♥ Healthy Heart

By Dr. Scott L. Rose

The human body is an amazing organism. The more we learn about it, the more we see the interrelationships between seemingly unrelated parts of the body. The mouth is a wonderful example. It can directly influence our health and indirectly influence our health. Think of the mouth as the door to your home. An open door lets anything and everything in. Even a door that looks ok can have cracks, leaks, and other issues that allow wind, moisture, insects, etc. to invade.

The mouth is a very specialized and complex door. There have been many studies that correlate the health of the mouth to the health of the entire body. One study even suggests that the condition of the mouth can predict cardiovascular health just as well as cholesterol levels. A recent study showed that the inflammation caused by periodontal disease led to an increased risk of heart disease. While the exact mechanisms are not fully understood, the bacteria associated with gum disease are implicated in the formation of atherosclerosis – hardening of the arteries. The two mechanisms that seem most likely are that the toxins from the bacteria help in the formation of the fatty deposits known as plaque. The other mechanism is that these toxins trigger specific proteins released that create inflammation of the blood vessels.

Regardless of the exact mechanism, it starts with oral bacteria. Knowing this, there is no reason not to get regular cleanings and examinations where the health of the gums and bone are evaluated. Old fillings that are breaking down also harbor bad bacteria and this can also add to the problem. The good news is there are many therapies and treatments for dental decay, gum disease, and gum inflammation. In addition to traditional treatments, I have found that adding other adjunctive therapies, such as lasers and ozone, help healing and promote health. The bottom line is: be proactive. Fix your door.

Good Health Dental
440-542-1200
www.goodhealth.dental
www.tmjcleveland.com

The Medina County Women’s Journal E-Series Event

You are invited to join us on Thursday March 8, 2018 at Root Candles in Medina from 10:30am- 2pm for The Medina County Women’s Journal E-Series Luncheon Event.

Meet over ten local health conscious businesses at the 14th Annual Women’s Journal E-Series Luncheon where you will learn about the most common diseases and health concerns affecting you and your family.

Discuss innovative breakthroughs for your family’s needs in orthopedic care, addiction, options for labor and delivery to how to feel your best during menopause and how to keeping your family healthy while taking care of multiple generations.

  • Ask The Experts the questions you always wanted to know…
  • How to prioritize and balance work and taking care of family members of multiple generations?
  • What are all the options for staying healthy and feeling your best during menopause?
  • Are you or a family member suffering needless joint pain or a sport’s injury?
  • What vitamins and supplements are recommended to keep my family healthy?
  • Expecting a baby in 2018? What are my options for labor and delivery?
  • Considering higher education for you or your family?

Learn the answers from our panelists and SO MUCH MORE!

Meet the Ask the Expert Panelist:

Diulus
Dowell Fearon

MarleneHradek

Register by 3/2/18 – $20 ea. LIMITED SEATING AVAILABLE | Includes lunch from Corkscrew Saloon, Panel Presentation, Sample teas and dessert from Miss Molly’s Tea Room | PLUS Visit Health Conscious Vendors, Door Prizes & Discover Root Candles.

REGISTER & DETAILS AT WWW.WOMENS-JOURNAL.COM/ESERIES2018 or CALL 330-722-5788 and press option 1 or email medina@womens-journal.com

Lung Cancer Alliance Praises Bipartisan, Bicameral Congressional Leadership On Women’s Health Imperative

Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Representatives Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ), Rick Nolan (D-MN), Barbara Comstock (R-VA) and Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR) Bring Priority Focus to Accelerated Research and Screening Services for Women Impacted by Lung Cancer

Screen Shot 2018-02-11 at 10.41.08 PMThe Lung Cancer Alliance (LCA) hailed the reintroduction of the Women and Lung Cancer Research and Preventive Services Act, which brings priority focus to a women’s health imperative. The legislation was introduced with bipartisan support in both the Senate and House of Representatives.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death of women in both the U.S. and around the world. It takes the lives of more women than breast, ovarian, cervical, and uterine cancers – combined.  An average of 193 women die each day from lung cancer, one every 7 minutes, and two-thirds of never smokers diagnosed with lung cancer are women.

Screen Shot 2018-02-11 at 10.41.00 PM
“There is no stronger signal of a commitment to improving the health of women and transforming their medical care than the legislative actions taken today by these bipartisan, Congressional leaders,” said Laurie Fenton Ambrose, President and CEO of Lung Cancer Alliance. “Lung cancer is a women’s health imperative. It behaves differently in women than men, particularly those who have never smoked. This legislation will help unlock answers to research questions and bring a coordinated federal plan of action to promote access to life-saving preventive services, improve quality of life and increase survival for women and the entire lung cancer community.”

The legislation requires an interagency team, led by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, conduct a thorough study and report to Congress in 180 days on the status of and recommendations for:

  • Increased research on women and lung cancer;
  • Improved access to lung cancer preventive services; and,
  • National public awareness and education campaigns on lung cancer.
“Lung cancer disproportionately affects women and is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Despite the dramatic impact this has on the women of Florida and across the country, there is a lack of research into why there is this disparate, particularly amongst women non-smokers,” said Senator Rubio. “This bill is a positive step in the battle against lung cancer. It will encourage more research into why lung cancer disproportionately impacts women so we can develop better prevention and treatment tools and have a better understanding of the disease as a whole.”

“Lung cancer kills more women each year than any other cancer. This year, 70,500 women will lose their lives to this disease. While we know the key risk factors, many questions remain,” said Senator Feinstein. “For example, lung cancer has been found in far more women who don’t smoke than in men who don’t smoke, and we have no idea why. This bill will strengthen our efforts to reduce lung cancer and improve patient outcomes.”

“Countless individuals across the country have been devastated by lung cancer. This is a very personal issue for my family, responsible for the death of both of my wife Tina’s parents. This is a disease that knows no boundaries in who it affects thus we must double our efforts to raise awareness and reduce mortality,” Rep. LoBiondo said. “I remain committed to working with Reps. Nolan, Comstock, Bonamici and other colleagues and groups who want to help make real strides against lung cancer.”

“When it comes to supporting lung cancer research, we can and must do better. The study directed by our bill will begin to help us understand why there is a greater prevalence of lung cancer amongst women and, in particular, amongst women who have never smoked. Though the passage of this bipartisan, bicameral legislation would mark but one small step in the fight against lung cancer, it would make an enormous difference to those who are battling lung cancer and their loved ones. I am proud to join my Congressional Lung Cancer Caucus Co-Chair Frank LoBiondo as an original cosponsor of this measure,” said Rep. Nolan.

“The Women and Lung Cancer Research and Preventive Services Act will provide critical resources in combating the largest cause of cancer death in women, lung cancer.  We all know someone who has been devastated by lung cancer. I lost a best friend this past year and I join as an original cosponsor on this important bipartisan legislation in honor of Kate O’Beirne, who we lost last April. This legislation will allow us to make greater progress in battling lung cancer and providing increased access to preventive services that can save lives,” Rep. Comstock said. 

“My mother is a lung cancer survivor, so I know we can and must do more to prevent this devastating disease and support women who are battling it,” Rep. Bonamici said. “I’m proud to join this important bipartisan effort that will improve lung cancer research and result in better outcomes for women.”

In March, LCA will collaborate with the Congressional Lung Cancer Caucus to hold a briefing on women and lung cancer to educate members of Congress about the need for and impact of this legislation. For more details about this or other advocacy efforts, please contact policy@lungcanceralliance.org.

About Lung Cancer Alliance:
Lung Cancer Alliance serves and listens to those living with and at risk for lung cancer to reduce stigma, improve quality of life and increase survival. We empower our community by helping people navigate the paths of early detection, diagnosis and treatment. Insights allow us to improve care, amplify awareness, drive advocacy and lead research with the vision of tripling the number of survivors in the next decade. For more information, please visit www.lungcanceralliance.org. Follow Lung Cancer Alliance on Facebook: www.facebook.com/lungcanceralliance  and on Twitter @LCAorg using the hashtag #LCpolicy.

Source:Lung Cancer Alliance
Chris Davis 
cdavis@lungcanceralliance.org 202-742-1895